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SHOWTIME BRINGS PAINTINGS TO LIFE WITH
"PICTURE WINDOWS"

Presented by Epiphany Pictures and Norman Jewison's Yorktown Productions


New York, July II, SHOWTIME blends the finest elements of film, literature and art in PICTURE WINDOWS, two trilogies comprised of three half-hour episodes each, produced by Norman Jewison's Yorktown Productions and Sky vision/Partners. Each segment, inspired by a classic painting and based on a famous short story, creates a compelling narrative brought to life by some of Hollywood's top directors. The notable names behind the camera are: Peter Bogdanovich, John Boorman, Norman Jewison, Joe Dante, Jonathan Kaplan and Bob Rafelson. Scheduled to premiere in early 1996, PICTURE WINDOWS is executive - "produced by Norman Jewison/ Gayle Fraser-Baigelman and Howard Rosen. Jeff Freilich is the supervising producer. Scott JT Frank, Dan Halperin and David Wesley Wachs created and produced the series. Shot in Toronto, Los Angeles and the south of France, PICTURE WINDOWS features John Hurt, Robert Loggia, Alan Arkin, Brian Keith, George Segal, Sally Kirkland, Kathleen Quinlan and Michael Lerner, bringing alive the canvasses of artists such as Hopper, Botticelli, Degas and Hockney, among others.

The episodes include:

"Lightning," featuring the paintings of Frederic Remington, was directed by Joe Dante from a classic Zane Grey short story, adapted by Jim Byrnes. Brian Keith, Kathleen Quinlan, Ron Perlman and Henry Jones star.

"Soir Bleu," based on the 1914 painting by Edward Hopper, was directed by Norman Jewison from a story by Seth Flicker. Alan Arkin, Dan Hedaya and Rosana DeSoto star.

"Song of Songs," inspired by Sandro Botticelli's "La Primavera," was directed by Peter Bogdanovich, from a script by Harry Mark Petrakis and John Petrakis. George Segal, Sally Kirkland and Brooke Adams star.

"Two Nudes Bathing," written and directed by John Boorman, is based on the famous anonymous 16th century painting that hangs in the Louvre. John Hurt and Charley Boorman star in this Frederic Raphael story that was shot on location in the south of France.

"Language of the Heart," inspired by Edward Degas' "The Rehearsal," was directed by Jonathan Kaplan from a script by Bruce Meade. Michael Lerner stars.

"Armed Response," directed by Bob Rafelson, stars Robert Loggia in a piece inspired by David Hockney's "Pool with Two Figures."

PICTURE WINDOWS is an exclusive presentation of Showtime Entertainment Group.



EPISODE SYNOPSES

"Armed Response"
Directed by Bob Rafelson
Painting: Pool with Two Figures by David Hockney

Inspired by David Hockney's "Pool with Two Figures," this episode chronicles the events in the life of its main character. Merce Sugarwater (ROBERT LOGGIA)/ a successful lawyer/ and his art dealer wife (LAURA PRESS) live in the luxury afforded them bv their combined careers/ content with the lifestyle reflective of the American dream.

Dreams turn to nightmares, however/ when the attempted murder of Merce and his wife is revealed to have been planned by their children Murray (JAMES CALVERT) and Paula (CYNDY PRESTON). The would-be assassin (STEVE ZAHN)/ is released and exonerated by Merce himself when the children blackmail him with the shocking secrets of the Sugarwater household.



"Two Nudes Bathing"
Directed by John Boorman
Painting: Two Nudes Bathing by an anonymous painter, circa 16th century

The anonymous painting "Gabrielle d'Estrees and One of Her Sisters/" which hangs in the Louvre Museum in Paris, is the enigmatic inspiration for John Boorman's drama. The painting depicts two women/ naked in a bath/ sharing an intimate moment.

The episode chronicles the events in the life of the Comte de Chevereu (JOHN HURT)/ a malicious man who has virtually imprisoned his daughters, Gabrielle (JOCELYN WEST) and Blanche (JULIETTE CATON), after their wayward mother left him for another man. Fearing similar fate for his beloved daughters, the Comte forbids them contact with the outside world. The Comte hires Henri, an artist (CHARLEY BOORMAN), to paint two portraits - one for himself and one for his daughters' potential suitors.

Blackmailing the artist to reveal the secrets of physical love, the girls are later observed bv Henri acting out his verbal descriptions. The resulting portrait frees the girls from their tyrannical father, forever capturing the shared wisdom of their emerging sensuality.



"Lightning"
Directed by Joe Dante
Painting: Various works by Frederic Remington

A sepia tone montage of Remington's sketches dissolves into one another on the screen, finally settling on the image of a world-weary prospector and his trusty burro. Director Joe Dante's "Lightning" tells the story of Tappan (BRIAN KEITH), a prospector who has struck it rich, but his burro has died. Having discovered gold, and in need of a burro, Tappan buys the only available animal from the local assay office - a mule
named Lightning.

Unbeknownst to him/ Tappan has been followed by Plummer (RON PERLMAN) and Mollie (KATHLEEN QUINLAN)/ a tin horn gambler and a shy hooker who intend to rob him of his gold. In a wry story of misplaced affection and Wild West justice/Plummer and Mollie meet a mule's judgment.



"Song of Songs"
Directed by Peter Bogdanovich
Painting: La Primavera by Sandro Botticelli

Botticelli's "Primavera" is the inspiration behind Peter Bogdanovich's "Song of Songs," a love story. When Blossom (SALLY KIRKLAND), the proprietor of the "Saucy Secrets" lingerie shop opens her new store in a quiet suburban neighborhood, Ted Varnas(GEORGE SEGAL), owner of the local bakery/ takes particular offense. His offense however turns to a crumbling defense when confronted with Blossom's passionate
advances.

For the first time in his faithful 21-year marriage to Angle (BROOKE ADAMS), Ted falls in love with Blossom and asks Angle for a divorce. In a twist of fate, "Song of Songs" unravels the riddle of a true romance played out in the midst of a mid-life crisis.



"Soir Bleu"
Directed by Norman Jewison
Painting: Soir Bleu by Edward Hopper

Edward Hopper's painting of the forlorn circus clown is brought brilliantly to life by director Norman Jewison in "Soir Bleu," a tragic tale of love and murder. The story of Tully, the sad clown (ALAN ARKIN) and his love for trapeze artist Lola (ROSANA DESOTO), "Soir Bleu" chronicles events on the touring company's fateful last
performances.

In love with Lola, the beautiful and abused wife of the circus manager (DAN HEDAYA), Tully gets embroiled in a fateful love triangle. A bitter-sweet study in contrasts, "Soir Bleu" juxtaposes the story of
the sad clown's anguish against the dazzling color and childlike joys of the circus.



"Language of the Heart"
Directed by Jonathan Kaplan
Painting: The Rehearsal by Edward Degas

Framed by a spiral staircase, a tableau of ballerinas captured in frozen arabesques under the watchful eye of a ballet master is the focus of Edgar Degas' "The Rehearsal." A single pair of legs steps onto the rehearsal hall floor as the painting comes to life.

Descending the stairs is Anna (TAMARA GORSKI), a beautiful young ballerina, the newest member of the 'corps de ballet' and the object of the Maestro's (MICHAEL LERNER) amorous intentions. Anna however, has an eye for a young street musician -the violinist, Mischa JOEL BISSONNETTE).

In a vivid love story set against the backdrop of the ballet world of the 1920s, "Language of the Heart" tells the story of Anna and Mischa's true love and the achievement of their dreams at the Maestro's premiere.